Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Best Ceviche Ever (with Recipe)

Last week we decided to take a break and visit some friends in Puerto Escondido. It is very easy trip from Mexico City with a short one hour flight. On the other hand, it is a 13-15 hour drive in car. With a one and four-year-old, that option was quickly discarded. We have been to Puerto before so this time instead of just enjoying the immediate surroundings we fished, surfed, dined, and enjoyed the town a little more.

My 4-year-old went with my husband and our hosts on an early morning fishing trip which netted great results: a 90 lb. Sailfish and two Mahi-Mahi or Dorados as they are called here in Mexico. Upon the return to shore, the local fish mongers prepared the fish right on the beach. I had the Sailfish prepared like thick salmon steaks and the Mahi-Mahi filleted. Immediately upon their arrival at the house, I decided to make a very simple ceviche with some of the Mahi-Mahi. I chose a simple ceviche because when you have fresh fish like this you want to taste it as much as possible and enjoy the great texture. This ceviche was one of the best I have ever had and the right-out-of-the-sea freshness made all the difference. Wow!

I took the Mahi-Mahi fillets and cut them into 1/2 inch cubes. This is important for a couple of reasons - first the fish needs to physically stand up to the lime. If you cut the fish too thin, the fish will disintegrate into a mushy mess. This is especially true with fish that is not very fresh. Second, you want to enjoy the full flavor of a fresh fish. Keeping it in cubes maintains the flavor in every bite as the lime doesn't totally penetrate the fish. It is very popular in restaurants these days to have exotic ceviches with lots of extra or non-traditional ingredients which overtake the subtle flavor of fresh fish (it may also be a sign that you are not having fresh fish). When you have fresh fish, keep it simple. Don't over complicate the delicate flavor. Everything else should take a back seat.

Okay, here comes my personal pet peeve -- throw away those funny plastic lime concentrate bottles. I know they are there . . . in the back of your refrigerator. . . mocking me. Only use fresh-squeezed citrus as noted in the recipe. In fact, I don't know when lime concentrate is ever needed in recipes. For this recipe, it is important for the acid in the lime to work as it should in "cooking" the fish. Concentrate just doesn't do the job very well. Additionally, I prefer the smaller or mid-sized limes. We don't have those big thick rind limes that you find in the States. I am sure they will work fine if you can't find the smaller ones.

Is your mouth watering yet? Anyone up for a Mexican Coastal Cooking Week in Puerto Escondido? Red Snapper a la Veracruzana, local Rock Lobster in Pipian, Grilled Chile Encrusted Shrimp? Let me know and we will make it happen!

Here is the link to the PDF file for the complete recipe. Enjoy!

As always . . . Peace, Love, and Good Food!
Chef Ana

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Hola ...muchas gracias por las excelentes recetas y por compartir muchas de las cosas que hace al igual de dejarnos saber y ver mas de las cosas tan bonitas de Mexico. Se me hace que este es el tipo de sitios que deberian de ver mas en Europa tambien ya que mucha gente solo escucha cosas negativas y cambian la perspectiva de la gente. Ojala tenga la oportunidad de llegar mas alla de los Estados Unidos que ya se sabe que les gusta mucho de lo nuestro. Hasta pronto.